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The best 0% purchase credit cards

The best 0% purchase credit cards

Want to make a big purchase and spread the cost of repayments? We reveal the top 0% purchase credit cards currently on the market.

lovemoney staff

Banking and Borrowing

lovemoney staff
Updated on 23 November 2022

If you want to make a big purchase and spread the cost of repaying it, a 0% purchase credit card can be a good option – provided you keep on top of your repayments.

These cards give you a lengthy interest-free period to pay off your debt without incurring any costs whatsoever.

Barclaycard offers the longest interest-free period for purchases at up to 25 months (but you could get a shorter interest-free period if approved).

Below is a roundup of the longest purchase cards on the market.

We're working with Compare the Market* where you can find out what credit cards you are eligible for without harming your credit score. Click here to find out more or jump straight in and discover which credit cards you're likely to qualify for.

The longest 0% purchase credit cards

Credit card

0% period (months)

Representative APR

Barclaycard Platinum Purchase and Balance Transfer Card

Up to 25

22.9%

NatWest/RBS Purchase and Balance Transfer Card (only open to existing customers who earn at least £10,000 a year)

24

22.9%

M&S Bank Shopping Plus Card

21

23.9%

Sainsbury’s Bank Dual 21 Month Card

Up to 21

21.9%

Some of these top cards also offer lengthy 0% interest-free periods on balance transfers, which might come in handy if you have existing credit card debt.

But we'd recommend choosing a dedicated 0% balance transfer card if that's your primary focus.   

When 0% purchase cards are a good idea

The beauty of a 0% purchase credit card is there are no fees, so every penny goes to paying off your debt. Provided you clear the debt before the 0% window ends, you won't have spent any more than the original cost of your purchase.

So, if you know you've got a big purchase ahead of you, going for a 0% credit card is a good option.

Why you need to think carefully about what card you pay with

The risks of a 0% purchase card

Compare credit cards (Image: Compare the Market - loveMONEY)

There are some hurdles to consider though.

For starters, you need to make more than the minimum payment each month or you could lose the interest-free offer.

However, this shouldn't be a risk for most as you need to try and pay off as much as possible each month.

Fail to do so and you could be left with a sizeable balance when the 0% window closes.

If this happens, you should consider shifting the remaining debt to a 0% balance transfer card, which will also offer an interest-free period on your debt (although many will charge a fee). 

For more on balance transfer cards, head this way.

Finally, there’s the fact that to get your hands on a 0% card, you’ll need to have a very good credit record.

Credit card providers don’t make a habit of handing out these cards to any borrower – ironically, borrowers who would most benefit from breathing space to pay off their debts are the ones who find it most difficult to get their hands on such cards.

So, make sure you use an eligibility checker to work out how likely you are to successfully apply for a card without leaving a mark on your credit report.

We're working with Compare the Market* where you can find out what credit cards you are eligible for without harming your credit score. Click here to find out more or jump straight in and discover which credit cards you're likely to qualify for.

Improve your chances of getting a 0% card

It's always a good idea to ensure your credit rating is as spotless as possible.

There are several simple things you can do to improve your credit rating, which we've detailed in this guide.

Still not found the right card for you? View our complete guide to credit cards to see all your options.

*loveMONEY has teamed up with Compare the Market to provide credit card price comparison services. Compare the Market Limited acts as a credit broker, not a lender. To apply you must be a UK resident and aged 18 or over. Credit is subject to status and eligibility.

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