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Government green plans to push energy bills up by £95

Rebecca Rutt
by Lovemoney Staff Rebecca Rutt on 23 November 2012  |  Comments 20 comments

Energy bills are set to rise again, this time to fund green energy investment.

Government green plans to push energy bills up by £95

Gas and electricity bills are about to go up as the Government sets out plans for energy companies to charge customers more to fund renewable energy projects.

The new proposals, to be announced next week in the Energy Bill, suggest average energy bills could increase by £95.

This is because energy companies will be able to increase the amount they charge customers from £2.35 billion to £9.8 billion by 2020 in order to fund the investment.

Rising bills

The Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) said that the average increase to consumer bills will be £95 a year - or 7% - by 2020 but critics have suggested that figure could be even higher. 

Almost all the big six energy providers have announced hikes in energy bills recently, despite several such as Centrica (which owns British Gas), also making big profits this year.

So the news UK energy bills are set to rise even more is not expected to go down well. However, the Government says by the end of the decade new energy resources could push down the overall cost, counterbalancing the extra charged for renewable investment.

Renewable energy

The reason this funding is increasing is to reduce our dependence on using gas, which is to be slowly replaced by renewable energy sources, such as wind and nuclear power.

But environmental groups have also criticised the plan which will go against Britain’s climate change commitments. The Government has also delayed making a decision on setting a target for carbon emissions until 2016 – after the next election.

Ed Davey, the Energy and Climate Change Secretary, said: “The decisions we’ve reached are true to the Coalition Agreement, they mean we can introduce the Energy Bill next week and have essential electricity market reforms up and running by 2014 as planned.

“They will allow us to meet our legally binding carbon reduction and renewable energy obligations and will bring on the investment required to keep the lights on and bills affordable for consumers.”

More on gas and electricity:

Energy companies keep £1.2 billion of our savings

Investigation launched into ‘fixed’ gas prices

Co-operative Energy to cut its electricity bills

Energy firms to be forced to put customers onto cheapest deals

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Comments (20)

  • PoohBah
    Love rating 23
    PoohBah said

    @leaseholdreform: when you say "salt" you have just picked one word out of context. They are not necessarily referring to common salt, or sodium chloride; there are many kinds of salt, and the one in question is most likely to be molten thorium salt, which you definitely would not want to sprinkle on your fish and chips. It can be used as a coolant - cool being a relative term here, as the boiling point of most salts is in excess of 1400°C - or as a fuel in its own right. Molten sodium chloride could conceivably be used as a coolant, but it is highly corrosive.

    Report on 26 November 2012  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Seaboot
    Love rating 2
    Seaboot said

    Guess I'm a bit slow and do not understand the concept---I pay extra money to a private utility company so they can--what? Sell me even more expensive electricity! Should it be the utility companies investing in their own research and development reducing their need to rely on foreign imports. Hopefully getting their production costs down so their shareholders are happy and maybe sell to their customers at a rate which does not mean we have to live in cold houses. Whatever we as consumers will remain well down the order of utility companies priorities

    Report on 06 December 2012  |  Love thisLove  0 loves

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