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DRIPs

blkbrd37
by blkbrd37 04 February 2013  |  Comments 3 comments  |  Love Love  0 loves

Are DRIPs (Direct Investment Programs) available in the UK?

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Comments (3)

  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster posted

    They certainly are, but not all PLCs do them. I suggest that you go to the Computershare site, and find out from them the names of the companies that have a DRIP scheme. Often firms who have DRIPs use Computershare as their subcontractor. You can also go to a firm's website, and find out there if they do DRIPs. Failing that, you can ring them up, ask for shareholder liaison, and ask them.

    Posted on 04 February 2013 | Love Love  0 loves Report
  • blkbrd37
    Love rating 2
    blkbrd37 posted

    Great stuff. Very much appreciated.

    Posted on 04 February 2013 | Love Love  0 loves Report
  • MikeGG1
    Love rating 909
    MikeGG1 posted

    In the UK, the abbreviation DRIP refers to Dividend Re-Investment Plan. It is done by most of the Company Registrars.

    in it, the dividend is used to buy shares on the market and usually there is 1% added to the cost for stamp duty and dealing costs. The price is not known in advance.

    What you may be referring to may be Scrip Dividend, whereby new shares are created by the company in lieu of dividend which does not have the 1% added. The price is fixed as the average of the first few days after going ex-dividend and you usually have a chance to cancel the option (if it is mandated) or to make the election (if not mandated) if you are quick.

    Only a few companies offer a Scrip Dividend.

    Mike

    Posted on 05 February 2013 | Love Love  0 loves Report

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