Can you sue supermarkets for selling you horse meat?

Cliff D'Arcy
by Lovemoney Staff Cliff D'Arcy on 08 February 2013  |  Comments 40 comments

As Findus admits to selling lasagne which contained as much as 100% horse meat, we look at whether you can sue the supermarkets who sold you the ready meals.

Can you sue supermarkets for selling you horse meat?

Last month news broke that the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) had found traces of horse meat in beef burgers on sale in the UK and Ireland. While most of these 'value' burgers contained traces of horse DNA, some contained up to 29% horse meat.

As the scale of this scandal grew, supermarkets including Asda, Aldi, the Co-op, Iceland, Sainsbury's and Tesco cleared their shelves of frozen burgers made in three factories under suspicion. In total, more than ten million burgers have been discarded as unfit for human consumption.

This week the scandal worsened with news that frozen food specialist Findus has admitted to selling frozen lasagne meals containing between 60% and 100% horse meat. These meals were made by European firm Comigel. As a precaution, Tesco and Aldi yesterday started stripping Comigel-made lasagne and bolognese meals from their shelves.

In a statement, the Food Standards Agency said the evidence pointed to "either gross negligence or deliberate contamination".

It added: "Anyone who has [these products] in their freezer should return them to retailers as a precaution. In addition to the widespread testing we are doing, we’ve instructed the industry to urgently carry out its own tests on processed-beef products to see whether horsemeat is present."

Questions that need answers

Of course, when a meal contains 100% horse meat instead of beef, then this is a long way from mere contamination.

So there are a number of questions that we need answers to. They include:

  • If a 'beef lasagne' turns out to be nearly 100% horse meat, does this not constitute false advertising or even fraud?
  • Could we as individuals claim compensation from Findus for being completely misled into eating horse meat masquerading as beef?
  • Could UK consumers and animal lovers come together to, say, bring a class-action lawsuit against Findus?
  • Has Findus (and the supermarkets) broken any laws? If so, what offences have been committed?

A lawyer's view

To find out more about where things stand legally, I sought insight from top global law firm Eversheds. Richard Matthews, head of product liability at Eversheds and a member of its International Food and Drink Sector Group, explained that it is unlawful in the European Union to sell or offer for sale food which is 'not of the nature or substance or quality demanded' by consumers. This certainly sounds like being sold horse meat that you thought was beef!

The retailers - in this instance, the supermarkets - will be calculating their losses, and passing those costs on to their suppliers. They don't even have to prove negligence - it's sufficient that the product supplied did not meet its description.

It's the suppliers, and their insurers, who will be sweating. That said, typically product liability policies will only apply when the product has caused physical injury or damage to property. 

In effect, it seems unlikely that consumers can seek recompense and damages for trace deposits (in most cases, well below 1%) of equine DNA in their burgers and meals. However, where horse meat accounts for 100% (or perhaps even 30%) of total meat content, then there is surely a case to answer. Indeed, it seems likely that the makers and suppliers of such tainted meat will face criminal, as well as civil, prosecution.

Of course, only the very rich can afford to take multinational corporations to court, so this isn't an option for most all of us. Even so, if you have any products containing processed beef that you have any concerns about, then simply return them to retailers for a full refund. Given the widening scale of this scandal, you won't be refused your money back.

More on food:

Horse meat: would you eat it?

The true cost of diet plans

Can you still feed a family for £55 a week?

Poundland versus Asda, Tesco and Sainsbury's

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Comments (40)

  • electricblue
    Love rating 769
    electricblue said

    So the short article was 'Can you sue? NO'.

    Unless there was negligence or fraudulent misrepresentation causing actual loss, physical harm or distress then of course you can't sue. Now go and eat the nice horsey burgers and get a life, people.

    I bet Findus now start getting requests for 'original recipe' Lasagne and all the consumers of cheap burgers will wonder why they don't taste as good.

    Report on 08 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    As the saying goes: "I'm so hungry, I could eat a horse."

    Report on 09 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • orangecat
    Love rating 7
    orangecat said

    Horse meat is eating in France as a normal diet, along with snails and frogs legs, so what is the problem, "Findus" whom sourced their meat from there should be well aware of this fact, so why are they now pursuing a claim against them?

    The problem lays in the description on the labelling, which is deceptive to the consumer, 100% beef, doesn’t "Findus" test their products?

    orangecat

    Report on 10 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Spikus
    Love rating 25
    Spikus said

    Naturally it isn't the supermarkets fault. They don't actually check their food chains. They just make sweeping statements like 'line caught tuna' when in reality it is caught along with dolphins in massive nets. When they get caught then they simply bin the supplier and go to one who isn't being investigated.

    Horse generally is better for you than beef. But people here are prissy about eating horses. If this happened on the continent they would likely be less concerned and it wouldn't be filling the papers and TV every day.

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  • sandbar
    Love rating 4
    sandbar said

    I have no moral objection to eating horsemeat. If it was on the menu or listed as and ingredient I'd probably try it. However this is not the point here. Leaving aside the issue of getting a different meat from that listed on the product ingredients this shows that the whole system of food traceability is completely broken. After BSE a detailed system of passports and marking was introduced, I'm sure at great cost, so that beef could be traced back to the source in case of any problems arising. Clearly this isn't working if it ends up at illegal horsemeat. Also, horses may be treated with drugs which are not suitable for use in foodstuffs - how do we have any guarantee that the horsemeat is not contaminated in this way if it wasn't supposed to be there in the first place.

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  • CuNNaXXa
    Love rating 410
    CuNNaXXa said

    I find it amazing that so many people DON'T have a problem eating horse meat. How many of them actually ride, or keep, horses? I bet none.

    So, to put this into a better perspective, we could substitute horse meat for dog meat, and source our beef lasagne and burgers from Korea, where they DO eat dog. How many people would be up in arms then, because we had been conned into eat man's best friend.

    As for the argument about what the Europeans do, that doesn't hold water. We are British, and have different customs from our frogs leg eating cousins. If they want to eat frogs legs, snails, birds and horses, that is their choice, but it isn't ours. We still prefer roast beef (not bleedin' horse), fish and chips, pie and mash, and Yorkshire puddings.

    I have spent a good proportion of my adult life in and around horses, and I find eating them offensive. In fact, I would label my offence in the same capacity as a Muslim or a Jew being forced to eat pig. To me, eating horse meat is no different from eating Cuddles, or Rex, or any other dog of my acquaintance (or just generally eating dog, which the Koreans do).

    Besides this fact, it is still wrong to label something as being beef when it clearly isn't. How do they justify selling 100% horse meat as BEEF?

    And as for the retailers being blameless, they are not. They have a legal duty of care to ensure that everything they sell through their outlets is fit and fits the description on the packaging. After all, the consumer enters into an agreement with the retailer, while the retailer enters into an agreement with the wholesaler or producer.

    In this day and age, supermarkets are driven purely by profit, omitting the commitment to the consumer. They buy as cheaply as possible, and sell for as much as possible, often in conflict with the food manufacturers. The Premier Food v Tescos scandal is one such instance where Tescos boycotted whole food lines because their profit was diminishing, while enforcing Premier to reduce their own profit margins.

    With this in mind, it is no wonder that Tescos and Findus used an overseas company to provide very cheap meat. In fact, the buyers at Tesco should have had alarm bells ringing, because even wholesale prices of beef can only go so low.

    The meat industry is one of the most heavily regulated in UK law. Meat must be declared fit for human consumption before a butcher is allowed to sell it. So how did this company, along with Tescos and Findus manage to dupe the regulator. Did they submit false products for testing along with false paperwork?

    (I know several local egg sellers who are regulated even though they sell free range eggs, and have to submit regular samples to the Food Agency to show they are complying with regulations).

    This is a scandal on a massive scale, because not only have they deceived us, but also the FSA, and the regulations put in place to protect us.

    Criminal doesn't even start to cover this scandal.

    So, not only have they upset the horse and animal loving community (horses are considered pets along with dogs, cats, gerbils and hamsters), but they have taken the piss out of the very regulations that are supposed to stop this from happening.

    Breach of Trust, anyone?

    Oh, and how long have they been getting away with selling meat that could possibly be contaminated with Bute or other medicines not meant for human consumption? When did Shergar disappear again?

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  • mikecunliffe
    Love rating 25
    mikecunliffe said

    I've just watched and listened to the environment minister on the politics program on BBC. He's trying to reassure us that the processed food products STILL on the shelves are perfectly safe. Given that he has no way of tracing the quality of the horse meat (it has been reported that it was sourced in Romania) his assurances are worthless.

    The authorities should place an immediate ban on ALL imported processed meat meals.

    Consider the situation if this had taken place in France, with imported, processed meals arriving from the U.K. that contained, say, guinea pig meat passed-off as pork. La Belle France would have banned ALL food imports from the U.K. and consequently bolstered their own local industry.

    Let us "go continental" and use this as an opportunity to bolster our own very safe, very reliable and very under-supported UK Farming industry.

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  • electricblue
    Love rating 769
    electricblue said

    I don't know which is greater here, the hypocrisy regarding which animals are eaten by humans or the plain stupidity of trying to justify which species are' OK' and which are offensive. The serious issue is whether food grade meat was substitued or meat potentially contaminated with veterinary medicine. I'm more concerned that low grade meat from Rumania is in a very poorly regulated supply chain than what the species acually is. There is apparently no sure way of assuring the quality of any meat which has passed through the hands of meat 'brokers' in Eastern Europe.

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  • simongrenshaw@yahoo.com
    Love rating 2
    simongrenshaw@yahoo.com said

    I really like horse meat. It tastes better than beef and is better for you. It tastes very much like venison and is also a quarter of the price of beef. I do understand how some people are upset because they view horses as pets but it shouldn't stop other people that don't feel the same from eating them.

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  • easygoing
    Love rating 170
    easygoing said

    Well CuNNaXXa, that is a point of view and your personal one. To suggest that others should think like you is unreasonable. If you eat animals then it is only a matter of taste or tradition as to what you eat. Not having wittingly tasted horse, or dog for that matter, I am unable to make a judgement.

    I would suggest that at the root of the problem is the pressure that supermarkets put on their suppliers to meet a price even though they know that those demands are impossible. Is it any wonder then that this sort of criminality happens? The supermarkets are being naive if they hadn't already guessed the outcome of their demands.

    Lowering the tone a bit, this would be a lovely opportunity to get back at the French for their banning of British beef!

    The American style class action is not available in this country but there are other ways.

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  • Mike10613
    Love rating 626
    Mike10613 said

    It seems the horse meat could be contaminated with veterinary drugs. They found a pain killer in some of it. I thought I was feeling better... :) Sue? Nay, I doubt it...

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  • Steviebaby1959
    Love rating 34
    Steviebaby1959 said

    Well, CuNNaXXa, I think you need to get out more, enrich your life by eating different meals, if they don't appeal to you, that's fair enough, but, please, just because you haven't eaten horse, how can you tell US that have eaten it, that it shouldn't be allowed, whooooaaaa Neddy (forgive the pun) get away from your computer, and savour the delights of foreign cuisine, you might just like some of it, living in towns and cities in modern Britain you don't need to travel abroad to try something different on any night of the week, broaden your horizons.

    And for your information, the custom of eating horses spread across Europe in the 19th century, it isn't something new, if you visited Eire, many individual butchers in Dublin, Cork and Limerick sell horsemeat over the counter, and Southern Ireland is famed for it's horseracing/rearing culture, placing a 20 Euro bet at The Curragh whilst eating a horseyburger, is commonplace.

    As for this particular news issue, the main supplier of the ''meat'' is Comigel from France, they are one of Western Europes largest suppliers of pre-prepared frozen dishes, which is eaten regularly in France, Belgium, Holland, Luxembourg, Lichtenstein, Scandinavia, and now the UK.

    For supermarkets to announce that this fraud may have been going on for the last 6/9 months, is scandalous, if the Food Standards Agency hadn't spent much of its time on trivial matters with British food preparation, such as Signposting and traffic light labelling, this problem may have been detected sooner, who runs this organisation, I wonder?

    I cannot understand the lawyer's response above either, it isn't so much that the horsemeat may, or, may not, include carciogenes that cause harm to our persons, surely, it's under The Sale of Goods Act and the Trades Descriptions Act, to name but 2 Acts of Parliament, that prevail in Britain, and that as many big conglomerate Supermarkets that can be punished under these Statutes so much the better, for the Tax Payer, and consumers, alike, which is what the legal beavers in this country should be focusing on.

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  • Vern54
    Love rating 14
    Vern54 said

    I needed to cut down on my Shergar consumption so this isn't helping!!

    Sorry!!

    One of the first cases that law students study is the Donoghue vs Stevenson case which shows that customers are owed a duty of care when sold items. In that case, a bottle of lemonade (or ginger beer) contained the decomposed remains of a snail which, not surprisingly, Donoghue found revulsive and was violently sick. The manufacturer was found guilty as they had not exercised a duty of care in preventing items getting into the product.

    I doubt any meat eater could claim to be violently sick at the thought of eating horse meat, especially considering what can go into beefburgers and sausages etc. We have all found small fatty bits and gristle and no doubt the same parts from a horse were used.

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  • Latent
    Love rating 21
    Latent said

    I also watched the Minister For Something Or Other being an absolute prat on TV this Sunday morning. Hums and aahs and looking blank at the camera are not good government policy. Being asked the same question several times and being not only unable but also unwilling to give a definitive answer.... looked like Cameron at PM's Question Time. I guess it's catching!

    In recent years we've cut down drastically on prepared foods, only an occasional impulse buy that has a nice pic on the packet! Usually regretting it afterwards. Some Linda McCartney Plaits yesterday a case in point!!

    So, more 'fresh' fish from the mobile fish van, more 'fresh' veggies from the local greengrocer and some 'well hung' red meat from the local butchers. Hopefully no chemicals....

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  • innyminy
    Love rating 1
    innyminy said

    To those who think that people not fussed about eating horse don't ride.. I have been around horses since I was 5 years old, and I own a horse now. I also own chickens and dogs... all pets. Yet I do find the attitude of 'horses being pets and musn't eat them' pretty small minded. If u eat meat, then you eat meat. Ok I wouldn't choose to eat horse or dog, but I accept there are cultures that do. What I do believe is that whatever animals we eat should be well cared for in their lives before slaughter. I know that there are horse farms in this country where the animals are exported to France for slaughter. No prob so long as animal welfare is maintained. If this type of meat is what's been found, then there will be no drugs like bute etc in the horses.

    The serious issue here is that there is clearly no traceability with the meat being sold, and the fact that the public have been mislead in what they are buying. Eat horse, fine, but it should be a choice made by the individual. Clearly someone up the chain has decided cheaper horse meat will increase their profit margins, with no moral regard to Joe public 'choice'.

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  • silkycat
    Love rating 49
    silkycat said

    Whilst I am sympathetic to those who find it morally repugnant to eat horse, that is not the issue here. What matters is that suppliers and retailers have been supplying a product described as beef which wasn't. Surely food retailers are culpable in the same way as any other retailers who supply a mis-described product. Their only defence is that the product was not knowingly supplied by them as containing horse. However given the prices that they impose on suppliers surely they should have smelt a rat (excuse me)!

    We then have the issue of where the horse meat was sourced from and if it was fit for human consumption. Presumably Irish horse meat is better regulated than that coming from Eastern Europe? As has been said the obvious reaction is to ban all UK meat imports until a proper investigation is carried out. We already source huge quantities of pork products from Holland and Denmark, which although they may be 'food grade' can be produced in questionable welfare conditions. This makes it difficult for UK producers to compete on price. These countries would certainly put additional pressure on EU suppliers to clean up their act.

    At least there should be some good news here for the highly regulated and hard pressed British farmer. But, can UK suppliers take up the slack and are we the consumers prepared to pay more for our meat?

    As usual somebody somewhere has made a lot of money out of this at the expense of UK consumers. Perhaps bankers aren't so bad after all!

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  • SeaBee
    Love rating 15
    SeaBee said

    I guess that most supermarkets won't be too bothered unless you are one of those individuals who keep their receipts. Tesco however might be a bit bothered, their 'Clubcard' retaining details of your purchases since the beginning of time. It will be interesting to see if anyone can force Tesco to produce their records.

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  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    Things are getting bad. I am hearing on the news that...well, first it was Ireland, then Poland, now Romania. I remember some decades back being told by a lady from Central Europe that if you bought a salami, chances are it was made from donkey meat. One has to realise that when one eats imported food, things in other countries are done just a little differently. If meat is processed and packed under another government's inspection, that may mean that the inspector is turning a blind eye because he has received a bung, or else he is totally incompetent.

    People like me, who are vegetarians, are enjoying this. George Bernard Shaw was right when he said that if you eat meat, your stomach is a cemetery for dead animals. Meat is murder. You meat-eaters are getting what you deserve.

    Yes, it is true that in some countries horses are used for food. And not just the meat. I have heard stories of a mother dying in childbirth, and the baby is fed mare's milk, the teat being a finger of a glove with a hole in it...and they still grow into fine figures of men - and women.

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  • ajrr1
    Love rating 19
    ajrr1 said

    Arblaster said "Meat is murder. You meat-eaters are getting what you deserve."

    Did you seriously just say that? Nice.

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  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    @ajrr1

    I certainly am being serious.

    It might be OK to eat horsemeat. But this stuff is there illicitly. For all you know it might have been declared unfit for human consumption. People are worried about what they are eating. Are they eating horse instead of beef? Guinea pig instead of pork? Ratmeat instead of chicken? Does that smoked sausage really contain donkey or mule meat? Certain types of meat will give you cancer or arteriosclerosis. Most forms of food poisoning involve meat. So if you are running to the jakes with the flux, it is likely because of some meat product you have eaten. Oh, you'd better see the quack about those chest pains.

    This morning, for breakfast, we had cauliflour, rice, and an avocado. Do you think we cared if the green part of the cauli came from a savoy cabbage? Or the brown rice contained bits of white rice? Or were we vexed whether the avocados came from Israel, Turkey or Mexico?

    Keep running to the toilet, all you meat eaters. Oh, dear, someone else is in there. Must be another carnivore. Now, was it the corned dog hash, or the cat and kidney pie...?

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  • Meduza
    Love rating 8
    Meduza said

    well, the last e.coli outbreak in europe was via vegetables. the one i remember in the usa was from vegetables either. whether you eat meat or not, the bugs and chemicals are all over the planet. some are naturally there, others introduced by humans due to poor hygiene, lowered farming standards, driven by greed and profits, etc.

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  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    well, the last e.coli outbreak in europe was via vegetables.

    Yes, it is true that mung beans eaten raw were blamed for the e.coli. Last I heard, the mung beans had either been eliminated from the inquiries, or the thing was at least under dispute.

    I said that MOST cases of food poisoning involve meat products. I also have my own experience. I have not had a bout of food poisoning for several years.

    The latest is that the police have raided a British meat processor and a British slaughterhouse. They are now saying on the BBC that all this horsemeat hoopla is systematic, so you carnivores have been eating God-knows-what for years.

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  • yocoxy
    Love rating 152
    yocoxy said

    I'm looking forward to the first case of veggie burgers contaminated with horse (or pork or any other meat for that matter). That'll quieten down the self righteous veggie warriors a little.

    This needs to get sorted, the perpetrators need to get prosecuted but no-one's going to die because they had a bit of horse mixed in with their 'beef' burgers.

    To be honest a bit of lean horse is probably better than all the offal, ears, eyes and other bits of cow that are normally in there..

    Anyone care that the burgers of a famous fast-food chain are poured into molds in liquid form during manufacture? Still, it's beef, so that's OK..

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  • Meduza
    Love rating 8
    Meduza said

    as i rarely eat processed meat (cheap burgers never, and if, then proper thick chilled ones instead of cheap tasteless frozen) so i guess i do not have to worry too much. i also do not mind eating meat of other mammals, at least if it is not human, haha. i do not eat at burger fastfoods either. i rather cook at home or go for better FOOD.

    i am a meat eater, i have always been and i do not remember to have any food poisoning ever. in fact, meat tends to be eaten properly cooked, it is fresh vegetables that are risky in many countries, including this one as even proper washing does not always remove the residues of contamination on the imported stuff.

    i dont want this to be a fight between meat and non-meat eaters, i just pointed to one fact.

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  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    @Meduza

    i also do not mind eating meat of other mammals, at least if it is not human, haha.

    Well, if the pork is a little more greasy than usual...

    My memory is coming back with reference to the European ecoli case. It was found that several of the people afflicted by ecoli had eaten raw bean sprouts that had come from one single firm. I forget which country this firm was in, but Germany rings a bell somewhere. The processing plant was investigated, and ecoli was not detected. The mung beans had been imported, but no country was mentioned. It was thought that either some of the beans were infected with ecoli, or the cause of the ecoli was something else entirely. That was the last I heard of it.

    Those who say that it does not matter because horsemeat is good for you raise my eybrows a few millimetres. They have missed the point entirely. In this case the beef has been adulterated with illegal horsemeat. That horsemeat may have been lying around for weeks, or it may have been declared unfit for human consumption. According to the Romanian government, their exported horsemeat was clearly labelled as horsemeat. Someone has taken this horsemeat and has deliberately laced beef products with it. This stuff is being fed to hospital patients, geriatrics, inmates and - last but not least - children. This is a serious matter.

    Sir Paul McCartney, no less, has said that with the foul practices in the meat industry, it was only a matter of time before something like this was going to happen. And I agree. Also, people have been looking down on us vegetarians regarding us as a bit odd. In one case, a carnivorous teacher called out social services to a vegetarian student. Luckily for the parents, the head of social services was a vegetarian herself. Well, now the worm has turned, and people are having to face up to the consequences of their vile eating habits. And I'm glad, The only horse I have eaten in the past two decades has been horseradish.

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  • Tanni
    Love rating 92
    Tanni said

    People are missing the point.

    The lawyers for the firms aswell as the health/food safety guys have been saying its a mislabelling issue.

    This is far from the truth.

    It's fraud.

    Food which has been blended with other non expectant materials to bulk it up so it can be sold off at great profit, duping the innocent consumer. This has been happening for years and I do not believe that this fraud is a recent phenomena.

    I would compare this, in legal terms to that incident of the Peckam spring as per fools and horses. Tap water sold as mineral water.

    This incident is blatant fraud. Liability should not just stop at the suppliers hiding behind limited companies and insurance policies. Liability should go further; confiscation orders of assets of all involved.

    Each person who has eaten this nonsense fraud product can sue under common law bringing in a private prosecution. You can claim damages for feelings hurt due to eating steptoes horse. Limit of damages is unlimited.

    Do not rely on lawyers to identify a breach and remedy. Demand a remedy to your perceived breach as an individual and pursue under a private prosecution.

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  • yocoxy
    Love rating 152
    yocoxy said

    ...or march on the Bastille..

    Tanni, any evidence that "this has been happening for years"?

    "This is just like Peckham Spring Water" ....er.. fiction?

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  • electricblue
    Love rating 769
    electricblue said

    Tanni, as with most times you comment, your ridiculous observations don't make things true. There are no 'class action' possibilites in the UK and none of the retailers have acted fraudulently. I find the fact that certain KFC's sell Halal meat extremely offensive and I'm sure there are many who don't realise that is what they get before buying. Not a cat in hell's chance of suing any of the retailers who themselves have been defrauded and are also victims.

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  • CuNNaXXa
    Love rating 410
    CuNNaXXa said

    I have just been told that the French are up in arms. Apparently, after doing some tests, they have discovered that their Horsemeat Lasagne has found to contain up to 100% beef. Could this be a mix up at the factory?

    (Oh, for those not quite with it, it is a JOKE).

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  • Tanni
    Love rating 92
    Tanni said

    @yocoxy, speaking with experience. As a student I would often work a few months during the break from University at a large meat/poultry and other foods processing firm. There were many students working there as well as people who did not speak English as their first language and people from various employment agencies.

    We observed cross contamination, poor or non existent hygiene, food products of various genre being stored together and even processed on the same machines at the same time.

    Food was processed there for the large supermarkets and the smaller discount supermarkets....all the meat was exactly the same stuff and nobdy really knew or checked its consistency. Never did we ever see any inspectors from any food agency or anything. Ham and turkey would look exactly the same after processing and often nobody could tell what they were. Mince was mixed or bulked up with other meats that we or other operatives could identify.

    Waste meat etc would be left in barrels for the local pet food companies to take..often we would see the same barrels of meat and waste cuts being taken to the local mincing department which was located in another building.

    Trucks would leave their meat containers round the back of the factory..for days with food in them. Sometimes the mains supply from the trailer would not be connected to the generater/power supply as there were not enough sockets! So that's food just sat their rotting away and soon to be minced up or processed for human consumption. No wonder I don't eat meat!

    @electricblur....

    what is your point? You cannot or won't understand that not everybody holds the same blind and rather "non' sensical point of view as you.

    You cannot Beleive KFC sell halal foods? Would you believe Marks and Sparks, and other large companies sell Kosher food products? Would be interesting to see whether that kosher product would also disgust you? What is your point again exactly. In the USA around 90% of food products are Kosher, have you ever noted how to identify a kosher product? No it doesn't say kosher on it,rather it has some identifying discrete marks and signs that only kosher aware persons would recognise.

    For your consideration Electricbluff, I suggest you read up and study what Halal and what Kosher is in terms of killing,slaughter and processing of an animal.....you will be surprised to learn that they are practically identical as they both use Abrahamic teachings to slaughter and process the animals.

    But will you read to further your understanding and awareness? I doubt it as your current and past comments suggest you still live in cuckoo land.

    In some circles, the comments of electricblur would be considered anti Semitic....dare you to repeat your rather stupid statement to a Jewish council. Did you see that not so long ago German authorities tried to ban circumcision....that's a kosher/halal thing too, incidentally they could not ban it.

    Do some research before you spew your hidden hatred.

    Report on 18 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Tanni
    Love rating 92
    Tanni said

    Ps

    In the 50's there was a similar incident, made very public that the food supply could not be trusted.

    It was done again with culling of the cows and sheep during the kill the mad cow dash.

    How many more do you need. Go through the archives and you will see incident after incident of food fraud.

    With the cost of living, in real terms rising, cost of production and processing increasing...the time is right for more of these food fraud cases.

    People with the mentality of Electricbluff will not recognise these facts as they are too successful at watching the news propaganda rather then do their brains justice by carrying out their own research. Arrogance and ignorance is rather evident in most posts by electricblur

    Report on 18 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    Tanni wrote:

    No wonder I don't eat meat!

    Good for you, Tanni.

    Report on 18 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Tanni
    Love rating 92
    Tanni said

    Yocoxy and electricblur : Checkout BBC Panorama on 18th Feb. echoes of my comments/concerns within the show. Also sky news showing why kosher is more trusted.

    Any further comments electricblur now that you've had it confirmed by the news media ?

    Report on 18 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Tanni
    Love rating 92
    Tanni said

    @ Arblaster ;-)

    Report on 18 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Meduza
    Love rating 8
    Meduza said

    At least, there was a suspicion about the adulteration back in 2011 and ministers were warned about this, says environment secretary Owen Paterson. FSA was asked to investigate this. It was written in Metro paper, from London. Not sure if it appeared in other media as I dont have time to read them.

    Report on 19 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    Meduza wrote:

    At least, there was a suspicion about the adulteration back in 2011 and ministers were warned about this, says environment secretary Owen Paterson.

    Here we go again. Reminds me of an interview I heard some years back on Radio 5 Dead with Vince Cable. He was on a finance committee, and said that he saw documents that showed that the government knew that the Icelandic banks were going to go tits up many months before they did. Since then we have had a change of government. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

    Report on 20 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • CuNNaXXa
    Love rating 410
    CuNNaXXa said

    My mother has commented that she visited a butcher back in the mid 70's who had in his yard the remains of a horse. She believes that he was mincing horse meat back in those days, and adding it to his beef mince to 'dilute' it.

    I think this issue has been going on for far longer than any of us realise.

    Remember that this is not about whether we have been eating horse meat, or what it tastes like, but the simple fact that a cheaper meat has been passed off for a more expensive meat. If it says 'Beef', it SHOULD be 'Beef', and not a 'Beef substitute'.

    Report on 21 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • PlasticPup
    Love rating 9
    PlasticPup said

    @Arblaster, but don't you hear the tomatos scream when you slice them!!!

    I brought a vegetarian sausage sandwich by mistake a little while ago, it looked like minced meat but tasted disgusting, I have absolutely no idea what was in it.

    Ok, away from the whole meateaters v vegetarian debate, the whole issue here is that we are being sold something that is not only not as described but also the health risk that it may contain dangerous drugs.

    Report on 21 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Meduza
    Love rating 8
    Meduza said

    as a meat eater that likes meat i also try to reduce its consumption and try vegetarian options of some meat products, such as quorn. once i got their sausages. the taste was not excellent but they were edible... until i found a piece of something that looked like a 1.5 cm long wood splinter. it was solid, light coloured, hard... definitely not a fungus protein and some spices that it all was supposed to be (not sure about the ingredients in whole). i ate the sausages in two goes, and guess what? i found another piece of that thing in another set. never buy them again. their "ham" is also nothing one should be proud of. and the so called cheese from soya - a pure disgrace of a word cheese. but i like alpro yogurts though. they are a good substitute for dairy as my body has adverse reactions when i "feast" on dairy for several consecutive days.

    Report on 21 February 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • electricblue
    Love rating 769
    electricblue said

    Coming back to this post and found Tanni's comments ! What a pompous ass you are, Tanni. I have Jewish friends and you can stick your absurd comments regarding anti-Semitism where the sun doesn't shine. I have every right to dislike a particular method of food preparation whether it's by Jews, Moslems or dirty Paul at the car boot sale. I don't give a toot if Moslems want to say a prayer as they slit a chicken's throat, but to me it's all b*llocks and I can despise their methods of food preparation just as much as they despise my bacon sandwich.

    Report on 03 August 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves

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