How to make yourself more employable

Lovemoney Staff
by Lovemoney Staff Lovemoney Staff on 20 August 2013  |  Comments 3 comments

Whether you're a new graduate or an experienced employee, these tips will help you bag your next job.

How to make yourself more employable

Finding a job at any time can be a tough process and the recession has cut the amount of available vacancies making the market extremely competitive.

The unemployment rate is currently at 7.8% in the UK and increased by 69,000  to 29.78 million in the three months to June which is the highest level since 1971.

This means getting a job is harder than ever but there are still jobs out there. We’ve produced a step-by-step guide to help you maximise your earning potential and increase your employability.

What employers really want

The first step is to make sure you understand what employers are looking for.

Each job you apply for will ask for certain qualities but there are also several general factors which can be applied to almost any job.

These include skills such as honesty and integrity, basic literacy, numeracy and oral communication skills, reliability and being hardworking and having a good work ethic. Other personal skills include having a positive, 'can do' attitude and being on time.

Working with other people and co-operation skills are also a must for most jobs along with being able to meet deadlines and punctuality.

These skills aren’t enough to land you a job but they’re a good starting point which most employers value above specific technical knowledge and skills associated with previous work experience.

What do you have to offer to an employee?

The second most important thing is to work out what you have to offer, and what you need to improve.

Your CV should list the main skills and qualifications you’ve achieved but you’ll also need to be able to recognise any weaknesses.

Job adverts will list specific requirements, so be sure to bring these up in an interview. These are also a good tool for working out where your skillset might be lacking. There is no point applying for something you’re not qualified for but you could consider some extra training.

Vision2Learn and Learndirect both offer a host of courses and Toastmasters is a non-profit organisation designed to help you hone your communication and leadership skills and improve your job prospects.

Improve your online reputation

The majority of employers will check your online reputation by Googling your name. They may also scan Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest to find out more about you.

This is an area where many potential employees let themselves down. Go through every online profile you have and make sure there’s nothing there which will portray you in a negative light.

A rule of thumb is never to post anything you wouldn’t be happy with your Mum seeing and our article - How your Facebook profile could get you the sack - explains why.

It’s also important to have an up-to-date online presence and websites such as LinkedIn are a good way to find new jobs. Check your profile regularly and keep your CV updated so potential employers can see it.

Work experience 

In the increasingly competitive fight for jobs, it's important you can show a commitment to the career of your choice, and self-motivation.

Work experience is a great way to do this as it not only gives you an inside view of your chosen sector, it should also provide you with some useful contacts.

It’s also not just for new graduates as many older employees can pick up a lot – especially if you’re looking for a career change. To make the experience work, you need to be motivated, confident and willing to do any job you’re given – quickly and efficiently.

Our article Your rights in an unpaid internship has more information.

This is a classic lovemoney article

More on jobs and employment:

Ten weird and wonderful jobs that really do exist

The dangers of telling lies on your CV

What to do if you're made redundant

Your rights in an unpaid internship

Redundancy pay: get the biggest payout if you lose your job

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Comments (3)

  • electricblue
    Love rating 769
    electricblue said

    There's always Poundland for all of you with degrees in Art History or Media Studies.

    Meanwhile all those with degrees in engineering are sifting through job offers from around the planet

    Report on 21 August 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Arblaster
    Love rating 43
    Arblaster said

    Whoever wrote this article is confusing employment with slavery.

    "To make the experience work, you need to be motivated, confident and willing to do any job you’re given – quickly and efficiently."

    So much for human rights.

    Report on 27 August 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves

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