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Cost of playing National Lottery to double

Simon Ward
by Lovemoney Staff Simon Ward on 16 January 2013  |  Comments 15 comments

Camelot says the price of a line will increase from £1 to £2 from the autumn and there will be changes to prize money amounts.

Cost of playing National Lottery to double

The cost of playing the National Lottery is to double from £1 to £2 a line from the autumn, operator Camelot has announced.

It’s the first price increase since the draw was launched in 1994.

To soften the blow, Camelot says the prize for matching three numbers will increase from £10 to £25. The average jackpot amount will also increase, to around £5 million for Saturday draws and around £2.5 million for Wednesdays.

However, the prize for matching five balls and the bonus will drop from an average of £100,000 to £50,000. Meanwhile, the prize for matching five balls will drop from an average of £1,500 to £1,000. But the prize for matching four balls will increase from an average of £60 to £100.

There will also be a Lotto raffle alongside each draw, where 50 winners will pocket £20,000 each. If the main Lotto jackpot rolls over, then the number of raffle winners will double to 100, with a triple rollover producing 200 winners and a quadruple rollover 400 winners.

Camelot says that, to date, the National Lottery has given away over £43 billion in prizes and created more than 3,000 millionaires.

Sales of draw-based games, including the National Lottery and EuroMillions, and instant play games, such as Lottery scratch cards, increased last year.

Will you keep playing the National Lottery when the price goes up? Let us know in the Comments section below.

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Comments (15)

  • Latent
    Love rating 21
    Latent said

    It won't make any difference to me as I will spend just the same as I do now and always the random 'lucky dip'. The problem comes with people that have been doing the same numbers every week, some of them since the start of the lottery. Will they then spend twice as much, or will they dump half of the numbers? If they dump and the numbers come up.... best not to check, hey!

    How long before it will be a fiver per line is the next question!

    Report on 17 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • Tanni
    Love rating 92
    Tanni said

    Save your pennies I mean pounds.

    We as a nation are being encourage to gamble left right and centre, advert after advert reminding us that we will get free money to gamble.

    I don't bother with the lottery or gambling. Beleive in yourself and work to earn, work smart and earn fast.

    Report on 17 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • PDB11
    Love rating 75
    PDB11 said

    I've never played the Lotto, and I don't mean to start now!

    Interesting piece of maths, though. When I saw those figures for average sizes of the prize pot, I thought, how can they guarantee that? Doesn't it depend how many play? But in fact the average number of people who share the pot also depends on how many play, and it all cancels out.

    Scary piece of maths, too: the sizes of the prise pots are going down (except the fixed £25 and the jackpot). The jackpot is going up, but we don't know by how much. Is it doubling? Probably not. The chances of winning are just the same. So people are to expect these not much bigger prizes for twice the outlay? Sounds like a scam to me.

    But then isn't it anyway?

    Report on 17 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • finnol49
    Love rating 27
    finnol49 said

    "The prize for matching 5 balls wil drop from an average of £1500 to £1000." Since when has the prize for matching 5 balls been £1500? I once matched 5 balls (no bonus ball) & won a measly £110!

    Report on 17 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • oakfern
    Love rating 0
    oakfern said

    It says average win for 4 balls is £60...(what year was that)? it was just £14 this week. Lottery is a scam...match 3 balls should be £25 minimum anyway. Its also NOT British owned...work that one out...our countrys national lottery owned by canadian pension fund...

    Report on 17 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • RichardG
    Love rating 3
    RichardG said

    The simple solution - don't play the National Lottery just play the Euromillions one. If enough people stop playing they will have to think about the new ticket price and prizes.

    Report on 17 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • lynmouth1
    Love rating 2
    lynmouth1 said

    I made the mistake of using the same numbers each time from the start. If I could just forget those numbers I would probably 'invest' occasionally even at £2 a line. I won't be paying a regular £16 month for both draws though and will just have to turn off the actual draw at the end of the Saturday show.

    Report on 17 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • CuNNaXXa
    Love rating 410
    CuNNaXXa said

    When it is £1 for one line of six numbers, the odds of getting all six right is roughly 14 million to one, so you have a 14,000,000 to 1 chance of winning the big one.

    Now, double that line stake from £1 to £2, making the odds of winning the big one 28,000,000 to 1.

    Also, unlike production and manufacturing, which has perceived overheads, the lottery collects our money, then dishes it back out, taking its running costs from collected funds. It is not like some resource that they need to buy has gone up in value, and they need to pass this cost on.

    In times of recession, when people are struggling to make ends meet, putting up the price of a line of numbers, where there is no guarantee of winning anything, is contrary to what it is supposed to be.

    The lottery is supposed to be a flutter, where we put a small amount of cash in the rare chance of winning a life changing amount of money. Forget about the charities that they support. Most of the people who buy lottery lines are NOT interested in the good causes, but in winning a life changing amount of money.

    There is no rational justification to increasing the cost of a lottery line. It is nothing more than greed. Its timing is also poor. Within increased fuel and energy costs, along with increases in the cost of living, paying double for your lottery lines is nothing more than criminal.

    So, to summarise, you are paying more, doubling the odds (14 million to 1 going up to 28 million to one) for a lower maximum payout.

    Report on 18 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • twistedwheelnut
    Love rating 2
    twistedwheelnut said

    CuNNaXXa "doubling the odds (14 million to 1 going up to 28 million to one) " .... i think you might want to re-check your maths. The odds of winning the top prize (6 numbers) is based on the fact that you choose 6 out of 49 numbers, it's absolutely nothing to do with the amount of money you stake.

    It's the inability to do simple maths like this that causes people to get into financial difficulty.

    Report on 18 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  1 love
  • oldhenry
    Love rating 343
    oldhenry said

    If you had put £10 a week on the lottery since its inception you will have wasted almost £10,000 by the anniversary of it this year.

    Mad seems to be the conclusion I draw. Do not forget doubling the stake gives you tehchance to lose twice as much , so in 20 years time you would have spent £20,000.

    Put the stake money in a jar and spend it every year and a luxury ( like gas) youwill feel much better.

    The few people who have won substantial sums have not always had happpyendings either. Too much money is a problem, as is too little .

    Report on 18 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • CuNNaXXa
    Love rating 410
    CuNNaXXa said

    twistedwheelnut said

    CuNNaXXa "doubling the odds (14 million to 1 going up to 28 million to one) " .... i think you might want to re-check your maths. The odds of winning the top prize (6 numbers) is based on the fact that you choose 6 out of 49 numbers, it's absolutely nothing to do with the amount of money you stake.

    It's the inability to do simple maths like this that causes people to get into financial difficulty.

    I knew someone would question this.

    As for my maths, I have an A level, so unless you have a degree, you are not in a position to question my maths.

    But because you have, I'll explain my meaning.

    The odds of winning with one line of numbers is roughly 14 million to one, and one line costs £1.

    Therefore, if you use two lines, costing £2, you reduce the odds to around 7 million to one.

    Now if the lottery double the cost of a line, it will cost you £2 for a 14 million to one chance of winning the lottery, which means that if you spent £1, the original sum, your odds of winning double to 28 million to one.

    Obviously, you won't be able to purchase a line for £1, but the knock on effect are those who budget a set amount each week or month. I do a workplace lottery, where we pay £1 a week. My colleagues have already stated that they are not prepared to pay more, so we will half the number of lines to keep the payment the same. This effectively means our odds of winning will half.

    So, if £10 buys ten lines now, but only five lines in a few months time, you are two times less likely to win the lottery when the price increases. So, if your chances of winning are reduced for the same sum, your odds diminish.

    I hope that is a satisfactory answer.

    Report on 18 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • babyhk
    Love rating 10
    babyhk said

    Take the lottery as a bit of fun. Who hasn,t treated a relative to the odd ticket or had the odd flutter.Considering a pint of beer or a take out coffee is £3+ it can be a treat at the end of the week.

    Those who are so oppose to the increase , then don,t buy.

    When sales go down then there might be a rethink.

    Report on 19 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • CuNNaXXa
    Love rating 410
    CuNNaXXa said

    As babyhk says, the lottery should be just a flutter, for a minimal amount. As soon as they start to double the cost of a line, it no longer becomes a flutter, but a serious drain on resources.

    Take someone who pays £5 for five lines on a Wednesday and Saturday. They spend £10 a week. Suddenly this will double to £20. We might not miss a tenner, but could we say the same for £20?

    £20? That is the average cost of a Chinese Takeaway.

    It all boils down to what you get for your money. People don't mind spending £10 for a slim chance of winning a life changing amount of money, but they are more likely to begrudge spending more for a chance of winning less of a life changing amount.

    This is supposed to be a bit of fun. A chance to win big with a very small investment. As soon as it starts biting into our hard earned cash, it no longer becomes fun.

    Report on 20 January 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • eLJay
    Love rating 78
    eLJay said

    I always play a line and plus 5 it just to give it a few chances. Costs £2 a throw. So if that now will cost £4 a throw then it's bye bye National Lottery and I'll just play the Euro millions instead.

    Less turn over for Camelot, less wages, less bonuses. Okay the odds are worse but the prize for the National lottery has become less and less due to the Euromillions and the odds of even getting a small win are being made even worse with the price increase.

    Worse deal and worse odds mean I may as well flutter on even worse overall odds with the Euromillions but at least if you win then you can buy a small chunk of Switzerland just for fun.

    Report on 07 March 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • oldcarguy
    Love rating 0
    oldcarguy said

    I admit for a while now I've let myself get caught in this clever scheme, they make a huge publicity event of the big winners making people think they are missing the chance of a lifetime if they aren't "in it". The reality is that you are more likely to get hit by a bus as you come out of the shop after buying your ticket than actually win a large sum. The government are getting a nice bit of extra revenue out of peoples vain attempts to get somewhere, so now Camelot must think we are more desperate than ever and will suffer the increase regardless - WRONG - thank you Camelot, you have just made me think about this in a light of day kind of way, I wont be giving you any more of my hard earned. Hope you all get made redundant ( or at the very least, lose your bonuses).

    Report on 15 September 2013  |  Love thisLove  0 loves

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