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How to claim on your insurance after a flood

Simon Ward
by Lovemoney Staff Simon Ward on 11 February 2014  |  Comments 2 comments

If you've been flooded and need to make an insurance claim, here's what you need to do.

How to claim on your insurance after a flood

As heavy rains return, flooding has again affected some parts of the UK. If you want to claim for flood damage on your insurance policy, here's what you need to do.

What to do immediately

1. Call your insurance company as soon as you can. Many firms provide a 24-hour helpline for policyholders to call for advice.

2. If you can, take photos or videos of the damage as this may help your claim.

3. Keep water-damaged furniture and other items. Don't dispose of any items of value until you're told to by a loss adjuster.

4. Get any emergency repair works that will prevent further damage done as soon as possible. However, more elaborate or permanent measures should not be taken without prior approval from your insurer.

5. Check whether your insurance company offers alternative accommodation as part of your cover. It's possible that you could be re-housed for weeks, so keep a complete record of any additional spending while you're not living at home.

You should also make sure you:

  • don't use electricity or gas supplies
  • don't drink tap water until you've been advised that it's safe to do so
  • move essentials and valuables to safety. You should transfer food, clothing and televisions upstairs to limit damage, and move furniture away from the walls.

What to do later on

1. If you have comprehensive car insurance, dig out your policy and check to see what level of cover you have for flood damage. Again, call your insurer's helpline for advice.

2. Consider hiring your own loss adjuster. In theory, loss adjusters are supposed to be independent mediators, but you may want your own assessment of the damage in case of a dispute.

3. Keep all receipts and other relevant paperwork safe. You'll need them to support your claim.

4. Avoid the temptation to quickly redecorate before your home has completely dried out.

If you have a problem with your insurance claim

If you feel that your claim isn't being dealt with quickly enough by your insurer, or your insurer rejects your claim, you can contact the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). It can contact the insurer on your behalf and try to get a resolution. You'll find more information at the Financial Ombudsman Service's website. Bear in mind that the insurer has eight weeks to respond to your complaint.

The FOS says it is seeing an increase in the number of complaints about delays with home insurance claims following flooding. It has called on insurers to be much quicker and clearer in how they deal with claims.

Renewing your insurance policy

Finally, if you've been bailed out by your insurer, then you may find that your neighbourhood is later categorised as a high-risk area. So, watch out for higher policy excesses or premiums when your next renewal notice arrives. After a big claim, or if your home is prone to flooding, you may find it difficult to find cover elsewhere, so this may be one of those occasions when you're better off sticking with your current provider, rather than shopping around for lower quotes.

This article has been updated since its original publication

More on flooding and insurance

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The best home insurance companies for customer service

Seven home insurance rip-offs

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Comments (2)

  • meldrewreborn
    Love rating 70
    meldrewreborn said

    As a matter of personal choice i would not buy a property that lies in an area prone to flooding. Recovering from a flood I can only visualise as being 50 times more stressful than moving - and most people think thats bad enough.

    I'd rent in a flood prone area - you can replace your stuff and move elsewhere - but to see one's property severely damaged and then have to cope with the extensive works, and then be concerned that it could happen again - well its not for me. And builders should offer a 100 year guarantee covering loses on a new build property flooding. That might put an end to any cavalier flood plain building proposals.

    Report on 04 January 2014  |  Love thisLove  0 loves
  • electricblue
    Love rating 769
    electricblue said

    Oh yes, we all know the clairvoyance of builders is legendary. Your new house costs £200K plus another £100K to underwrite a 100 year insurance policy. Brilliant idea, Meldrew. As one of my teachers used to say, 'Go to the top of the class and jump off'.

    Report on 08 January 2014  |  Love thisLove  0 loves

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