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Which banks are connected?

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Last updated on

09 July 2014

If your bank goes bust, a Government scheme will compensate you for loss of savings up to a maximum of £85,000. But the scheme isn't per account, it's per banking licence. We reveal which banks share a licence.

The Financial Services Compensation Scheme

Thanks to the near-collapse of some of Britain's biggest banks in 2008, the Government beefed up the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), the state-supported safety net for savers.

Today, the FSCS guarantees 100% of the first £85,000 of cash savings per person per banking licence (including interest). Therefore, a couple with up to £170,000 in a joint account has all of this cash covered by the FSCS.

Then again, the important words here are 'per banking licence'. You should always spread your cash across different providers. Then again, this is easier said than done, as a single licence can cover several different banks, building societies or brands.

Who owns whom?

To help you work out how safe your cash is we've compiled a list of the biggest British banking and savings providers, showing you who owns whom.

With hundreds of different institutions to choose from, we haven't listed them all here. Instead, we've concentrated on the UK's biggest brands.

Remember, you get only one lot of £85,000 of FSCS protection per person for the total amount you hold across these banking licences.

HBOS (Halifax/Bank of Scotland group)

  • AA
  • Bank of Scotland
  • Birmingham Midshires
  • Halifax
  • Intelligent Finance
  • Saga

Lloyds Banking Group

  • Cheltenham and Gloucester
  • Lloyds Bank

Despite HBOS being acquired by Lloyds Bank, both HBOS and Lloyds Banking Group continue to operate under separate banking licences.

TSB

TSB has its own banking licence now.

Barclays

  • Barclays
  • Barclays Direct (formerly ING Direct)
  • Standard Life
  • Woolwich

HSBC

  • First Direct
  • HSBC

Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS)

Royal Bank of Scotland

NatWest

NatWest

Ulster Bank

Ulster Bank

Coutts & Co

Coutts

Please note that RBS subsidiaries NatWest, Ulster Bank and Coutts all have their own, separate banking licences and are not covered by the RBS licence. So £85,000 with RBS and the same sum with NatWest, Ulster Bank and Coutts would be covered for four times £85,000 (£340,000) by the FSCS.

Santander UK

  • Cahoot
  • Santander

The Co-operative Bank

  • Britannia BS
  • Smile
  • The Co-operative Bank

Bank of Ireland UK

  • Bank of Ireland UK
  • Post Office

Clydesdale Bank PLC

  • Clydesdale Bank
  • Yorkshire Bank

Sainsbury's Bank

Sainsbury's Bank

Tesco Bank

Tesco Bank

Virgin Money

Virgin Money

Nationwide BS

  • Cheshire BS
  • Derbyshire BS
  • Dunfermline BS
  • Nationwide BS

Yorkshire BS

  • Barnsley BS
  • Chelsea BS
  • Egg
  • Norwich and Peterborough BS
  • Yorkshire BS

Coventry BS

  • Coventry BS
  • Stroud and Swindon BS

Skipton BS

  • Chesham BS (renamed Skipton BS)
  • Scarborough BS (renamed Skipton BS)
  • Skipton BS

Foreign banks and the FSCS

Some European banks accept British savings, but are not covered by the FSCS. Instead, under what's called the 'savings passport' scheme, some banks from the European Economic Area are covered by their home country's compensation scheme for savings.

The main one you might come across is the Dutch-owned Triodos Bank. It is covered by the Dutch equivalent of the FSCS up to a limit of €100,000 per person.

However, other banks from around the world with a UK subsidary are covered by the FSCS. These include:

  • Axis Bank UK
  • Bank of Cyprus UK
  • ICICI Bank UK
  • State Bank of India UK

NS&I

Finally, the Government's own piggy bank, National Savings & Investments (NS&I), is also covered by the FSCS. However, we expect the Government would cover all deposits in NS&I, apart from in the severest of financial meltdowns.

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